Horrifying video shows trans girl ‘harassed by school staff’ in bathroom

The Osseo Senior High School student uploaded a clip

A transgender girl in Minnesota has posted a horrifying video that appears to show Osseo Senior High School staff breaking into a bathroom stall while she was using the toilet.

Transgender teen Cece, who attends Osseo Senior High School in Maple Grove, Minnesota, posted two clips to Facebook of an incident in a women’s bathroom.

In the clip, the student is on the toilet with their trousers down while several adults, reportedly members of staff at the school, attempt to break into the locked stall.

“There’s no concern to safety just because I’m using the bathroom.”

One person can be seen peering over the top of the stall, before a stick is used to unlatch the lock on the stall door, which swings wide open in full view of several male and female staff members.

The student narrates: “I’m using the bathroom right now and they just violated me. They’re some perverts.

Trans girl Cece, a student at Osseo Senior High School student
Osseo Senior High School transgender student Cece

“There’s no concern to safety just because I’m using the bathroom.

“I’m so scared and violated right now. They just walked into the bathroom while I was using the bathroom for no reason.”

Osseo Senior High School claims clip ‘misrepresents’ the incident

The context of the clip could not be confirmed.

In a statement to CBS Minnesota, a spokesperson for the school claimed the video is “significantly misrepresenting the incident” but declined to give any alternate account of events.

The school said: “[The] staff works very hard every day to help ensure an inclusive school where all students feel welcome, respected and safe.

“We wish we could provide additional details about this incident but are committed to protecting the student’s right to data privacy.”

The school added: “When issues arise involving students, staff take appropriate actions to review the situation.”

Yahoo reports that the teen had been ordered not to use the women’s bathroom prior to the incident.

Osseo Senior High School slammed online

The video has attracted thousands of shares on Facebook and Twitter.

Many users condemned the school’s actions.

One said: “Doesn’t matter if she is trans or NOT!!! They violated her human rights. Standing in the bathroom waiting for her to come out is one thing. But the fact that they took the time using multiple items to get the door open is really sick.”

Another added: “No adult should be opening a bathroom stall door while the CHILD is using the bathroom and exposed!”

The Facebook post also attracted transphobic comments, with the top-rated comment claiming: “Take your ass to the mens bathroom you can’t force you’re alternative reality on other people facts is facts everyone of his cells has a Y chromosome witch makes him a male and males use the men restroom it’s common sense/”

The incident comes despite guidance issued by the Minnesota Department of Education in 2017, which states: “Transgender and gender nonconforming students should be afforded the opportunity to use the restroom of
their choice.

“Any student who wishes not to share a restroom with a transgender or gender nonconforming student can be provided a private space such as a single-user restroom.”

In October, a court ruled that a North Carolina anti-transgender law cannot be used to deny transgender people entry to public restrooms.

[“source=ndtv”]

An era of poop innovation has begun—and your boring bathroom is next

Poo has long been a North American taboo. But companies like Tushy and Squatty Potty are sensing an opportunity to strike gold in all that brown

When Bobby Edwards’s mother, Judy, finally went to the doctor to tackle her chronic constipation, her son didn’t think she would come back with an idea worth millions of dollars. But she couldn’t stop talking to her family and friends about the doctor’s simple recommendation—using a small footstool to raise her knees while on the toilet, so her puborectalis muscle could unkink her colon. “She became almost evangelical in her quest to help people poop better,” says Edwards.

So he sat down with some of the research around proper poop posture, and it seemed to add up for him. But when he looked online for devices that would help people squat on the toilet, the Internet came up empty. He even took the studies to his friends in the medical field, to see if there was something he was missing. “I would ask them and show them the diagrams, and they would say, ‘yes, this is exactly what we’re taught in medical school.’ And I would ask, ‘Why is there nothing out there to help people do this?’ And they said, ‘I don’t know.’ ”

To the enterprising 41-year-old from Utah, who was running a specialty construction company with his brother at the time, that was music to his ears: a giant niche in a mostly unseen market, backed by some scientific studies, waiting to be filled by a simple, basic product—essentially, a formula for business success. He sold $700,000 worth of Squatty Potties online in 2012; two years later, they got nationwide retail distribution, and last year, stools for your stool raked in USD $33-million in sales.

Squatty Potty isn’t the only company taking advantage of this flush opportunity. Poo-Pourri, an oil-based spray that tamps down foul odours, has turned into an empire that reportedly has sold more than 17 million bottles since 2007. Tushy, which sells stylish bidets that can be affixed inside toilet bowls at home, has sold more than 50,000 units since 2016, having raised $1.4 million in capital for the still-small company. And new companies like Omigo continue to follow the path owned by Toto, a Japanese company whose sales of their flagship washlet (a high-tech toilet seat) have grown by nearly 30 per cent in just four years, to more than 40 million units worldwide.

And with innovations for every room of the house flooding the market, and money clearly to be made inside the one where our most sensitive business takes place, Edwards’s question is the right one: Why haven’t more businesses made number two their number-one priority?

Just look around your house, and consider how much it has evolved in just the last decade. You wake up in your bedroom on a high-tech foam mattress, perhaps delivered straight to your door, more refreshed because of the sleep-cycle monitor that buzzed you out of sleep at the ideal time. You walk into your kitchen, and press a button to turn a plastic pod into hot coffee in seconds, while the internet of things helps your fridge keep stock of the steak you’ll make in your home sous-vide precision cooker later tonight. In your living room, you use your phone to stream some music or a TV episode from one of the many services that give you instantaneous access to a huge chunk of the world’s media from your television. By infusing our homes, technology has made our day-to-day life better.

Our bathrooms, on the other hand, have remained largely innovation-free for decades. By the 1940s, more than half of Americans had access to a bathroom that had included cold and hot running water, a bathtub or shower, and of course, a flush toilet, about a century after they were first commercially produced. While the superficial items and design within the washroom has varied over time—shag carpeting, luxe towels, make-up vanities, jacuzzi tubs—the tools and structure of a washroom themselves have basically remained frozen in time. And for entrepreneurs, that unexplored frontier suggests brown could mean gold.

“Yes, I knew it helped my mother, but more importantly to me, I thought it was freaking hilarious that we’re supposed to be squatting to poop, and we’re not,” says Edwards. “It’s all about the better bathroom experience. We were all hiding out in our bathrooms, and now we’re talking.”

[“source=indianexpress”]

An era of poop innovation has begun—and your boring bathroom is next

Poo has long been a North American taboo. But companies like Tushy and Squatty Potty are sensing an opportunity to strike gold in all that brown

When Bobby Edwards’s mother, Judy, finally went to the doctor to tackle her chronic constipation, her son didn’t think she would come back with an idea worth millions of dollars. But she couldn’t stop talking to her family and friends about the doctor’s simple recommendation—using a small footstool to raise her knees while on the toilet, so her puborectalis muscle could unkink her colon. “She became almost evangelical in her quest to help people poop better,” says Edwards.

So he sat down with some of the research around proper poop posture, and it seemed to add up for him. But when he looked online for devices that would help people squat on the toilet, the Internet came up empty. He even took the studies to his friends in the medical field, to see if there was something he was missing. “I would ask them and show them the diagrams, and they would say, ‘yes, this is exactly what we’re taught in medical school.’ And I would ask, ‘Why is there nothing out there to help people do this?’ And they said, ‘I don’t know.’ ”

To the enterprising 41-year-old from Utah, who was running a specialty construction company with his brother at the time, that was music to his ears: a giant niche in a mostly unseen market, backed by some scientific studies, waiting to be filled by a simple, basic product—essentially, a formula for business success. He sold $700,000 worth of Squatty Potties online in 2012; two years later, they got nationwide retail distribution, and last year, stools for your stool raked in USD $33-million in sales.

Squatty Potty isn’t the only company taking advantage of this flush opportunity. Poo-Pourri, an oil-based spray that tamps down foul odours, has turned into an empire that reportedly has sold more than 17 million bottles since 2007. Tushy, which sells stylish bidets that can be affixed inside toilet bowls at home, has sold more than 50,000 units since 2016, having raised $1.4 million in capital for the still-small company. And new companies like Omigo continue to follow the path owned by Toto, a Japanese company whose sales of their flagship washlet (a high-tech toilet seat) have grown by nearly 30 per cent in just four years, to more than 40 million units worldwide.

And with innovations for every room of the house flooding the market, and money clearly to be made inside the one where our most sensitive business takes place, Edwards’s question is the right one: Why haven’t more businesses made number two their number-one priority?

Just look around your house, and consider how much it has evolved in just the last decade. You wake up in your bedroom on a high-tech foam mattress, perhaps delivered straight to your door, more refreshed because of the sleep-cycle monitor that buzzed you out of sleep at the ideal time. You walk into your kitchen, and press a button to turn a plastic pod into hot coffee in seconds, while the internet of things helps your fridge keep stock of the steak you’ll make in your home sous-vide precision cooker later tonight. In your living room, you use your phone to stream some music or a TV episode from one of the many services that give you instantaneous access to a huge chunk of the world’s media from your television. By infusing our homes, technology has made our day-to-day life better.

Our bathrooms, on the other hand, have remained largely innovation-free for decades. By the 1940s, more than half of Americans had access to a bathroom that had included cold and hot running water, a bathtub or shower, and of course, a flush toilet, about a century after they were first commercially produced. While the superficial items and design within the washroom has varied over time—shag carpeting, luxe towels, make-up vanities, jacuzzi tubs—the tools and structure of a washroom themselves have basically remained frozen in time. And for entrepreneurs, that unexplored frontier suggests brown could mean gold.

“Yes, I knew it helped my mother, but more importantly to me, I thought it was freaking hilarious that we’re supposed to be squatting to poop, and we’re not,” says Edwards. “It’s all about the better bathroom experience. We were all hiding out in our bathrooms, and now we’re talking.”

[“source=indianexpress”]

Teacher on leave after recording device found in bathroom

– A Massachusetts teacher has been placed on leave while the school and police investigate allegations he recorded a student using the faculty bathroom.

Bellingham schools Superintendent Peter Marano told parents this week that the teacher at Bellingham Memorial School was “removed from the classroom” on Nov. 9.

The teacher’s name has not been made public because the investigation is ongoing and no criminal charges have been announced.

The teacher has coached at the school for 14 years and also coaches baseball.

Police say a 14-year-old boy told a school resource officer last week that when a coach told him he could use the faculty bathroom, the boy found a box with a hole and a cellphone recording inside.

Students in grades 4 through 7 attend the school.

[“source=indianexpress”]

Robots Finally Learning to Clean the Bathroom

Team Homer teaches TIAGo to autonomously clean a toilet, and it’s about time

Team Homer teaches TIAGo to autonomously clean a toilet, and it's about time

A useful general home robot, as far as I’m concerned, needs to be able to do three things: fold laundry, wash dishes, and clean toilets. That’s all it would take to make me happy. We’ve seen some attempts at both laundry folding and washing dishes, but not a lot of bathroom cleaning. Now, thanks to the World Robot Summit (WRS) in Japan, robots are finally tackling this task. As part of a competition held at the event, robots had to clean water from around a toilet and clean trash off the floor. Team Homer at the University of Koblenz-Landau, Germany, managed to get things done with a TIAGo mobile manipulator that you could (almost) picture cleaning up your bathroom as well.

During the competition, judges randomly sprinkled water on and around a toilet. Teams had to clean at least 80 percent of the liquid and remove trash from the floor in order to get full points. The video below shows Team Homer’s run with a PAL Robotics TIAGo:

First the robot approaches the toilette, then he detects the toilet seat to clean it. The toilet seat is assumed to be planar and then estimated in the RGB-D data. The resulting segment is closed and thinned using morphology. The resulting line then serves as input for the end effector positions. We proposed the use of an sponge end effector. With this end effector we can soak up the liquid on the toilet seat and the ground, at the same time we are able to pick up small pieces of toilet paper as well as empty paper rolls. The picked trash is stored in a bin mounted at the side of the robot. In the end the robot cleans the floor.

There were a variety of different approaches that teams used for this challenge at the WRC, including building a robotic system around the entire bathroom to handle the cleaning tasks. Honestly, that’s probably a faster and more reliable way to solve the problem, but it’s also far less practical, which is why we’re much more impressed with Team Homer’s use of a mobile manipulator that was modified only with a sponge.

TIAGo isn’t particularly fast at the cleaning task, but as with UC Berkeley’s famous laundry folding PR2, speed shouldn’t be a significant factor since the idea would be that the robot just does its work when you’re not around. Robot vacuums are the same—who cares if it takes the thing an hour or two to do a job you could do in 20 minutes if it just runs while you’re off at work?

Having said that, we’re still a very long way from useful autonomous mobile manipulation in the home, and it’s more likely that we’ll see robots doing tasks like this in places like hotels, where each room is identical, there are lots of rooms, and cleaning has to happen every day. It’s situations like these in which robots can show their worth: Predictable environments, repetitive tasks, and enough work to do over a long enough period of time that an expensive robot has a reasonable chance of being a good investment. You could imagine that in the (sort of) near future, hotels might use teams of humans and robots to service rooms, with the humans doing the tricky tidying up (and probably making the bed), while the robots do the floors and bathroom.

The biggest obstacle to cleaning robots like these is, sadly, probably not related to robotics hardware or software. It’s that humans are really good at cleaning bathrooms, really fast at cleaning bathrooms, and really cheap at cleaning bathrooms. We don’t want to clean bathrooms, but we’ll do it anyway, and it’s likely that most of us won’t be willing to pay all that much for a robot that’s able to do that and nothing else.

Robots Finally Learning to Clean the Bathroom

Team Homer teaches TIAGo to autonomously clean a toilet, and it’s about time

Team Homer teaches TIAGo to autonomously clean a toilet, and it's about time
Photo: Team Homer/University of Koblenz-Landau

A useful general home robot, as far as I’m concerned, needs to be able to do three things: fold laundry, wash dishes, and clean toilets. That’s all it would take to make me happy. We’ve seen some attempts at both laundry folding and washing dishes, but not a lot of bathroom cleaning. Now, thanks to the World Robot Summit (WRS) in Japan, robots are finally tackling this task. As part of a competition held at the event, robots had to clean water from around a toilet and clean trash off the floor. Team Homer at the University of Koblenz-Landau, Germany, managed to get things done with a TIAGo mobile manipulator that you could (almost) picture cleaning up your bathroom as well.

During the competition, judges randomly sprinkled water on and around a toilet. Teams had to clean at least 80 percent of the liquid and remove trash from the floor in order to get full points. The video below shows Team Homer’s run with a PAL Robotics TIAGo:

First the robot approaches the toilette, then he detects the toilet seat to clean it. The toilet seat is assumed to be planar and then estimated in the RGB-D data. The resulting segment is closed and thinned using morphology. The resulting line then serves as input for the end effector positions. We proposed the use of an sponge end effector. With this end effector we can soak up the liquid on the toilet seat and the ground, at the same time we are able to pick up small pieces of toilet paper as well as empty paper rolls. The picked trash is stored in a bin mounted at the side of the robot. In the end the robot cleans the floor.

There were a variety of different approaches that teams used for this challenge at the WRC, including building a robotic system around the entire bathroom to handle the cleaning tasks. Honestly, that’s probably a faster and more reliable way to solve the problem, but it’s also far less practical, which is why we’re much more impressed with Team Homer’s use of a mobile manipulator that was modified only with a sponge.

TIAGo isn’t particularly fast at the cleaning task, but as with UC Berkeley’s famous laundry folding PR2, speed shouldn’t be a significant factor since the idea would be that the robot just does its work when you’re not around. Robot vacuums are the same—who cares if it takes the thing an hour or two to do a job you could do in 20 minutes if it just runs while you’re off at work?

Having said that, we’re still a very long way from useful autonomous mobile manipulation in the home, and it’s more likely that we’ll see robots doing tasks like this in places like hotels, where each room is identical, there are lots of rooms, and cleaning has to happen every day. It’s situations like these in which robots can show their worth: Predictable environments, repetitive tasks, and enough work to do over a long enough period of time that an expensive robot has a reasonable chance of being a good investment. You could imagine that in the (sort of) near future, hotels might use teams of humans and robots to service rooms, with the humans doing the tricky tidying up (and probably making the bed), while the robots do the floors and bathroom.

The biggest obstacle to cleaning robots like these is, sadly, probably not related to robotics hardware or software. It’s that humans are really good at cleaning bathrooms, really fast at cleaning bathrooms, and really cheap at cleaning bathrooms. We don’t want to clean bathrooms, but we’ll do it anyway, and it’s likely that most of us won’t be willing to pay all that much for a robot that’s able to do that and nothing else.

 

[“source=indianexpress”]